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US Defends Iraq Record after WikiLeaks Furore - ASHARQ AL-AWSAT English Archive
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WASHINGTON, (AFP) — US officials defended the US military’s record probing civilian deaths and abuse in Iraq after graphic revelations in leaked secret documents triggered worldwide concern and condemnation.

The whistleblower website WikiLeaks released an unprecedented 400,000 classified US documents, which recount widespread torture in Iraqi prisons and purport to show 15,000 more civilian deaths than previously disclosed.

General George Casey, the top officer in the US Army who earlier headed forces in Iraq for three of the bloodiest years in the war, on Monday denied that the United States “turned a blind eye” to prisoner abuse.

“That’s just not the case. Our policy all along was when American soldiers encountered prisoner abuse, it was to stop it and then report it immediately up the American chain of command and up the Iraqi chain of command,” he said.

“It doesn’t ring true with me. We actively went out and tried to understand the impact of both our actions and the militant groups’ actions on civilians,” he told reporters.

State Department spokesman Philip Crowley also rejected WikiLeaks’ accusations, noting the United States trained Iraqi security forces in human rights.

“That’s one of the reasons why we’ve continued to have military forces in Iraq, to help with ongoing training of Iraqi security forces. And we believe that we’ve seen their performance improve over time,” Crowley said.

WikiLeaks, run by Australian-born computer hacker Julian Assange, said the documents showed a total of 109,032 deaths in Iraq between 2004 and 2009 — 66,081 of them civilians.

Britain, the main US ally in the Iraq war, said there was “no place” for mistreatment of detainees.

“We do as a matter of course investigate any allegation that is made against our troops,” said a spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron.

The Gulf Cooperation Council, which comprises six US-friendly Arab monarchies, urged Washington to “open a serious and transparent investigation” into possible “crimes against humanity.”

Rights groups also called for a probe, with New York-based Human Rights Watch saying the United States may have broken international law if it knowingly transferred prisoners to potential places of abuse.

The documents have had the most impact inside Iraq, where Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki has come under renewed pressure as he seeks a second term following hard-fought elections.

US President Barack Obama opposed the Iraq invasion and has declared an end to the US combat mission. But his administration fought the release of the documents, saying they could pose risks to US forces and their assets in Afghanistan and Iraq.

A military task force sifting through the records determined that WikiLeaks removed the names of the more than 300 individuals who would have been at risk, Pentagon spokesman Colonel Dave Lapan said.

But the documents still contain information such as titles or positions “that could lead to the identification of those individuals,” Lapan added.

Assange dismissed fears that the release put US troops and Iraqis at risk in an interview with CNN’s Larry King late Monday.

“In statements about this issue, the Pentagon is about as credible as North Korea. There are no names in the documents that we have released,” he said.

Human rights advocates joined the Pentagon in criticizing the group after it published 77,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan in July that identified Afghan informants for the US military, putting their lives at risk.

US critics said the episode highlighted the government’s excessive use of secrecy labels on documents that even the Pentagon describes as “mundane.”

“There are several things the US could do to reduce more of these unauthorized disclosures and one of them is to drastically cut back on the scale of classification,” said Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy.

During the CNN interview Assange also denounced lingering sex crime accusations against him as “false,” saying they distracted from Iraq war abuses revelations.

Assange is under investigation from Sweden for the alleged rape and molestation of two Swedish women, though prosecutors have not yet charged him more than two months since the allegations emerged.

Assange dismissed the questions on his personal life as “tabloid journalism”.

“It should be obvious that these things are not in balance and not proportionate,” Assange told CNN.

Asharq Al-Awsat

Asharq Al-Awsat

Asharq Al-Awsat is the world’s premier pan-Arab daily newspaper, printed simultaneously each day on four continents in 14 cities. Launched in London in 1978, Asharq Al-Awsat has established itself as the decisive publication on pan-Arab and international affairs, offering its readers in-depth analysis and exclusive editorials, as well as the most comprehensive coverage of the entire Arab world.

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