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Nasrallah threatens Saudi Arabia - ASHARQ AL-AWSAT English Archive
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How ironic! Hezbollah’s leader threatened the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and defended Syria’s oppressive regime in commemoration of Khomeini’s death. Nasrallah sang the praises of what he called the advantages the Wilayat Al Faqih concept has done for Iran and the Iranians.

In his speech, Nasrallah said that if Syria gets divided, Saudi Arabia will be next in line. This is an explicit threat to Riyadh from Hezbollah’s leader who is gradually revealing his sectarian face, political ignorance and selective memory. As we have said earlier, the more Nasrallah speaks, the more he implicates himself and his party. Nasrallah who today talks of a regional US-sponsored division project targeting Syria pretends to have forgotten what he himself said after Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal announced that the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques had withdrawn from the Lebanese mediation issue. Back then, Faisal warned about the dangers of dividing Lebanon.

Afterwards, Nasrallah came out sarcastically commenting on Faisal’s statement. In a televised speech, Nasrallah stated that “They say there is a danger of Lebanon getting divided.” Then he added: “What kind of talk is this? Lebanon in its entirety is this small,” while pointing to the palm of his hand and smiling in scorn. Today Nasrallah steps forth and warns against the dangers of dividing Lebanon. I have never seen anything more naïve. Let us contemplate the situation in more detail. Nasrallah supports Bahrain’s Shiaa who demand the establishment of an Islamic Bahraini republic and does not fear the consequences of a division over there or the US scheme. But in Syria’s case, Nasrallah fears any act of division because the people who have lived for decades under the rule of a minority – which has governed like monarchs – have finally risen to demand their rights and dignity. How hypocritical of him! Could there be uglier example of sectarianism?

Nasrallah’s threat to Saudi Arabia is clear and so are his targets. Hezbollah’s leader is like the “Analysts” of the Syrian regime on Arab satellite TV stations. However, Nasrallah is considered Iran’s “Analyst” on the ground and their weapon of choice when it comes to abducting Lebanon. But he is not a useful weapon especially when taking into consideration something important in his latest speech in which he threatened Saudi Arabia. Nasrallah disclosed a deep sense of fear within him when he advocated the necessity of developing the State concept in Lebanon. It was a plain attempt on Nasrallah’s part to forestall the anticipated repercussions of the Syrian regime’s toppling.

Even though Nasrallah projected confidence and jested with his audience by saying that the Wilayat Al Faqih State has no “Star Academy” youth in it, he must have definitely heard the Syrian youth shouting out: “No Iran, no Hezbollah…We want a Muslim who fears God.” Nasrallah knows very well this is not the “Star Academy” youth’s chant in Syria, but the chant of those who say it out loud: “We prefer death to humiliation!”

Nasrallah’s threats to Saudi Arabia are evident and so is his support for Syria’s suppressive regime. This attitude unmasks his sectarian face and unveils the fix Hezbollah is in today. Hezbollah knows that overthrowing the Damascus regime would mean the collapse of Iran’s foreign policy and the end of Hezbollah itself. This is the story and today we are watching the most exciting chapter of it. As for Saudi Arabia, Nasrallah and Iran know very well that those who have “Crossed the bridge” have nothing to fear.

Tariq Alhomayed

Tariq Alhomayed

Tariq Alhomayed is the former editor-in-chief of Asharq Al-Awsat. Mr. Alhomyed has been a guest analyst and commentator on numerous news and current affair programs, and during his distinguished career has held numerous positions at Asharq Al-Awsat, amongst other newspapers. Notably, he was the first journalist to interview Osama Bin Ladin's mother. Mr. Alhomayed holds a bachelor's degree in media studies from King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah. He is based in London.

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