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Saudi Arabia’s meteorological early warning system - ASHARQ AL-AWSAT English Archive
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Prince Turki bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz. (Asharq Al-Awsat Photo)

Prince Turki bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz. (Asharq Al-Awsat Photo)

Jeddah, Asharq Al-Awsat—In an interview with Asharq Al-Awsat, the head of the Presidency of Meteorology and Environment (PME) in Saudi Arabia, Prince Turki bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz, stressed his presidency’s constant efforts to protect individuals and property from the possible negative effects of inclement weather and environmental pollution.

He emphasized that his presidency will use all available means to achieve its mission, including adapting any suitable technology to improve the presidency’s ability to protect Saudis.

Prince Turki noted that the PME has recently introduced programs to help alert the public to weather conditions, including an automated early warning system that is considered the first system in the Arab world to provide around-the-clock information about Saudi Arabia’s meteorological phenomena.

The presidency has also developed several multimedia and social networking applications to engage more fully with the public. Prince Turki noted that the PME, in coordination with other competent authorities, publishes weather forecast information in accordance with the plan that the Ministry of Interior has ratified.

Speaking of the kingdom’s wildlife, Prince Turki said that there is evidence of a decline in the reproductive rates of some kinds of fish. This is likely caused by several factors, including the leveling and filling of waterfronts, plankton spreading in the water, the destruction of coral reefs, and direct discharge of waste into the sea.

Prince Turki indicated that there is no reason for concern over pollution in most Saudi cities—particularly the industrial ones—stressing that the kingdom is conducting around-the-clock monitoring of air quality.

While air quality in the country is generally good, some difficulties relating to both weather and manufacturing conditions have been reported. The ministry is considering installing pollution monitoring stations that would send wireless signals once a certain level of pollution is detected in the area.

Prince Turki also emphasized that the kingdom is making every effort to prevent desertification on local, national and international levels.

He called for waste water to be properly treated and used for irrigation and aquacultural projects.