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Egypt: Muslim Brotherhood protests reach foreign embassies - ASHARQ AL-AWSAT English Archive
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A Supporter of ousted President Mohammed Morsi holds a poster of him during clashes in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

A Supporter of ousted President Mohammed Morsi holds a poster of him during clashes in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Cairo, Asharq Al-Awsat—Supporters of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood have taken their protests against the ouster of former President Mohamed Mursi to foreign embassies in Cairo over the weekend, urged by the party leaders. Dozens protested outside the German embassy in Zamalek, while hundreds gathered in Garden City, close to the heavily guarded US and British embassies.

Brotherhood official spokesman Ahmed Aref told Asharq Al-Awsat that “the Egyptian people have the right to expect an unequivocal Western condemnation of the coup, not a dithering stand.”

The Muslim Brotherhood and other parties announced plans to protests outside the embassies of France, Canada, Japan and South Korea too. Aref said: “The embassies’ protests aim to deliver three messages. The first is total rejection of the military coup, and demanding a clear Western condemnation of it. It is not right that the countries which apply the principles of democracy, are the first to ignore them. Second, we want the world to condemn the killing of peaceful protesters [in reference to the killing of Brotherhood supporters by unknown assailants in Cairo and Mansoura recently], and third, we want to emphasize that we are adhering to constitutional legitimacy, and we will not have any political dialogue before the return of legitimacy.”

Senior figures in opposition to the Brotherhood say the leaders of the party know Mursi’s return is impossible, but are trying to improve their hand in the negotiations.

In response to those claims, Aref told Asharq Al-Awsat: “It is not logical to sacrifice what is dear to us, in order to gain something small in return. We are subjected to violence and murder, and we will not fail our allies or the Egyptian people, who started to fight the coup last Friday.”

Aref added that the Brotherhood was not working on a plan to formulate a political solution for the current problem. He said: “We did not create the problem. Whoever created it must find the solution, but we we will not accept the imposition of a fait accompli.”

The Muslim Brotherhood has also called on its supporters to launch an electronic protest on the official websites of the seven foreign embassies; US, UK, France, Japan, Canada, Germany and South Korea.

In the meantime, a court in Egypt has adjourned a hearing planned to look into the prosecutor-general’s decision to freeze the assets of Muslim Brotherhood leaders, until August 21. Those affected by the decision include senior figures, among them: Supreme Guide Mohammed Badie and his deputies, Khairat El-Shater, Mahmoud Izat, and Rashad El-Bayoumi.