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Muslim World League Chief: Extremists Exploit Veil Ban - ASHARQ AL-AWSAT English Archive
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London- Muslim World League Secretary General Mohammed al-Issa called on Muslim minorities living in non-Muslim countries to abide by the rules and laws of their host countries and to pursue their religious rights through legal channels. Issa has been keen on countering extremist ideology, believing that there must be an adverse party to confront the extremist ideology and disclose its attempts to defame Islam.

Issa added that the battle against extremism cannot be fought exclusively through military action, but rather include fighting extremist ideologies that spread their deviant thought.

Commenting on the objections raised in Brussels over his statement on the veil, he said the statement was in response to questions posed by the Muslim community and letters conveying rashness and willingness to face authorities with furor. “Every Muslim who enters a country pledges before to respect its constitution and culture or he/she won’t be allowed to enter. There is still hope, although the veil ban has become effective in some countries and is not a choice anymore. You either abide by the law or you get penalized and deported,” he added.

“Parliaments change and so do governments and legislation. The Muslim community should continue to ask for support. We, in the Muslim World League, back the Muslim community and stand against any illegal or unpeaceful attitude,” Issa continued.

Asked about Muslim figures in European countries who are trying to breach the law and incite against it, Issa said that it is a duty to face these figures who want to impose their religious singularity by force and are harming Islam in the first place.

Commenting on his several tours and activities in Islamic and non-Islamic countries in the past four months, Issa said that the Muslim World League is interested in reminding Islamic communities that their religion is a religion of forgiveness, tolerance, and coexistence.

“Some of these communities are going through tough conditions, including the lack of religious awareness,” he added. Issa stressed that the league doesn’t tackle people but topics. “We don’t name anyone but we might name ISIS or al-Qaeda,” he said.

Answering a question on the messages sent by extremists on social media, Issa said that more than 800 messages were sent by extremists around the world – some of them target specific countries, others are directed against Muslims in general or a specific category of Muslims and even non-Muslims.