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Iraq demands end to 'illegitimate' demos - ASHARQ AL-AWSAT English Archive
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Iraqi protesters burn an Iranian flag reading "Death to Iran" during a demonstration in Anbar's provincial capital Ramadi. (AFP)

Iraqi protesters burn an Iranian flag reading “Death to Iran” during a demonstration in Anbar’s provincial capital Ramadi. (AFP)

BAGHDAD, (AFP) — The Iraqi authorities on Monday called for an end to what a senior official said were illegal and illegitimate protest rallies in Sunni-majority provinces that have cut key trade routes.

The remarks released by the office of Ali al-Alaak, cabinet secretary general, came as protests blocking a key highway linking Iraq to Syria and Jordan entered a ninth day and authorities north of Baghdad declared general strikes.

The protests were sparked by the arrest on December 20 of at least nine of Finance Minister Rafa al-Essawi’s guards, and have spurred allegations that the Shiite-led government uses anti-terror legislation to target the Sunni minority.

A statement posted on Alaak’s office website acknowledged that the constitution guaranteed freedom of expression, assembly and dissent, but added that such freedoms must be practised “in a way that does not oppose public order.”

“These should not be carried out without the knowledge of authorities and their permission,” it said. “What is happening now… is breaking the law and the constitution.”

It said government employees must disregard a call from provincial authorities for a general strike aimed at pushing for the release of prisoners.

“All government offices in the provinces should not obey these illegitimate orders, or they will be held legally responsible,” it said.

Nineveh province’s three-day general strike extends to Tuesday, while Samarra, in Salaheddin province, began its own strike on Monday.

Protesters in Anbar province, meanwhile, blocked off the country’s main highway to Syria and Jordan for a ninth straight day.

He didn’t say how many pilgrims were among the casualties. Hillah is about 95 kilometers (60 miles) south of Baghdad.

Two doctors confirmed the casualty figures. All officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorized to release information.

Although violence has ebbed since the height of the insurgency in the past, some groups presumed to be primarily Sunni extremists are still able to launch lethal attacks nationwide against government officials or civilians.

Shiite pilgrims are one of their favorite targets. Each year, hundreds of thousands converge on the southern city of Karbala where the Imam Hussein is buried. Many travel on foot and the mass gatherings are frequently attacked despite tight security

Iraqi policemen search Shi'ite pilgrims as they walk to the holy city of Kerbala to mark Arbain in Baghdad. (R)

Iraqi policemen search Shi’ite pilgrims as they walk to the holy city of Kerbala to mark Arbain in Baghdad. (R)

An Iraqi federal policeman stands guard as Shiite pilgrims march to Karbala for Arbaeen in Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012.. (AP)

An Iraqi federal policeman stands guard as Shiite pilgrims march to Karbala for Arbaeen in Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012.. (AP)

Asharq Al-Awsat

Asharq Al-Awsat

Asharq Al-Awsat is the world’s premier pan-Arab daily newspaper, printed simultaneously each day on four continents in 14 cities. Launched in London in 1978, Asharq Al-Awsat has established itself as the decisive publication on pan-Arab and international affairs, offering its readers in-depth analysis and exclusive editorials, as well as the most comprehensive coverage of the entire Arab world.

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